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Meet.37: Research Data; Policy, Practice & Platforms

Meet.37: Research Data; Policy, Practice & Platforms

Wednesday, November 23rd at 7pm at Campfire CoWorking Space in Kennedy Town
4/F Cheung Hing Industrial Building, 12P Smithfield, Kennedy Town

Research data: the government data people forget about.
Meet.37 is on research data policy and practice in Hong Kong. Not just relevant to ivory tower academics, like government data it is taxpayer funded and benefits society. In most of the developed world academic research data is increasingly being mandated to be shared via academic research networks and repositories. Hong Kong has been far behind in the matter, but despite this lack of leadership from government (sound familiar?) the individual universities are taking matters into their own hands and are now building platforms for sharing academic papers and data. Much of this is summarized in a paper some of ODHK have recently put together (see the pre-print version in SocArXiv here: https://osf.io/3egzh/).

Our special guest this month is David Palmer (see picture of him recently presenting this work in Beijing) who has had a long history in Hong Kong as a Research Data & Records Development Librarian. He has worked at The University of Hong Kong Libraries (HKUL) since 1990, as Systems Librarian, Technical Services Support Team Leader, and Scholarly Communications Team Leader. He is a founding member of the Hong Kong Open Access Committee, and was instrumental in having HKU become signatory to the Berlin Declaration on Open Access in November 2009. He has led in many path-breaking projects, such as the first university in Asia to have all of its thesis collection (25,000) online in fulltext, the first institution worldwide to do an institutional upload of publication data for each researcher into the ResearcherID database, and the creation of author profiles in The Hub for each of HKU’s authors.

Setting the scene, Scott and Waltraut from ODHK will present some of the findings of their “open science” policy paper, before David presents a rare concrete victory for open in Hong Kong – the first CRIS (Current Research Information System) data portal here built upon the HKU Scholars Hub institutional repository. We will then end with a Q&A on what needs to happen next, and how can these lessons be applied to the wider open data ecosystem in Hong Kong.

Program for Meet.37:
Scott Edmunds (ODHK/GigaScience): Open science policies and practices in HK, introducing the ODHK case study studying these practice https://osf.io/3egzh/

Waltraut Ritter (ODHK/Knowledge Dialogues): Innovation potential of open research data.

David Palmer (HKU): From IR to CRIS. Open e-Research from the HKU Scholars Hub.

Q&A: What needs to happen next for Hong Kong research data, and what lessons can be learned for the wider open data ecosystem?

Please come with questions and participate in the Q&A at the end.

Date:
23rd November 2016, 7.00pm
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Directions:
NOTE: Do not follow Google Maps! Only 5 minutes from Kennedy Town MTR exit A, go UPHILL
Google Maps link: https://goo.gl/maps/3sYaHVScPNG2
Thank you to Campfire Collaborative Space for hosting us.

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Meet.36: Legco visit

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Tuesday, November, 22 at 1:45pm.
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Wanted a chance to visit Legco but never had the chance or didn’t know when’s the best time to go? Here’s your chance!

Hong Kong’s Legislative Council (Legco) is Hong Kong’s center seat for political debate and law-making. To stay informed about what is happening, we refer to the information Legco can provide to us. Increasingly, we rely on the data, to know what happened, what’s going on, and what’s coming up, because we want to review the votes of lawmakers, keep up with the current debate, and analyse upcoming legislation.

Tentative agenda
  • 2pm: Meet with OGCIO data.gov.hk team
  • 3:30pm: Tour of Legco
  • 4:30 Meet with Legco IT
  • 6:00 Meet with Charles Mok, Legco councillor for the IT functional constituency

Some engaged citizens have built tools to better analyse legco proceedings, to better keep track of law-makers’ votes, chart the debate, and follow the legislative agenda. Cutting through the information and data isn’t easy, and providing this data is no easy task. Join this event to know better how Legco works, to connect with Legco’s technical staff, to understand their challenges, share your interests, and share some expertise. Confirm your seat early!

You will need to bring your HKID for sign-in, and I will need the name on your HKID in advance. Please email this to me at bastien@opendatahk.com.

(This event may expand to include meetings with other government departments)

Meet.35: Data Data Data

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Wednesday, November 2 at 7pm at Campfire CoWorking Space in Kennedy Town
4/F Cheung Hing Industrial Building, 12P Smithfield, Kennedy Town

We’re going to work with data, and start building a repository for common public data. Data about land, public transportation, public safety, political districts, weather, pollution, shark fins, the ivory trade, anything. Even “better data” – the data we want to see on data.gov.hk and don’t see it. We’ll bring it all together, and make it shareable. We’ll discuss what we want to access, how we can get it, and liberate it for all to access and use.

You do NOT need to be technical to join this! Bring your minds and curiosity. Ask your questions, and start on a journey of getting the information you want.

We anticipate getting our hands dirty with data, so please bring your laptop if you can.

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Directions:
NOTE: Do not follow Google Maps! Only 5 minutes from Kennedy Town MTR exit A, go UPHILL
Google Maps link: https://goo.gl/maps/3sYaHVScPNG2

Thank you to Campfire Collaborative Space for hosting us.

Meet.34: Open Data Tools

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Let’s showcase some tools we are working on to support open data in Hong Kong:

  • A data warehouse for open data for the public;
  • A projects database listing of open data projects;
  • A(nother) Legco watch site, and more.

If you also have a project, come show it to us.
If you want to learn more and be part of the action, come out and get involved.

Confirm attendance on Facebook.

Directions:
NOTE: Do not follow Google Maps! Only 3 minutes from Kennedy Town MTR’s only exit A, go UPHILL.
Google Maps link: https://goo.gl/maps/3sYaHVScPNG2

Thank you to Campfire Collaborative Space for hosting us.

Date: Tomorrow, Wednesday October 12, 2016, 7pm

Location: Campfire Collaborative Space, 4/F, Cheung Hing Industrial Building, 12P Smithfield.
Directions: Only 3 minutes from Kennedy Town MTR’s only exit A, go UPHILL.
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Policy lessons learned from real smart cities

Policy lessons learned from real smart cities

Dumb Versus Smart Cities
img_2608It seemed appropriate in the same week that Hong Kong was hosting a smart city summit to host a meetup getting valuable insight into how a true smart city – Taipei – works. Taipei Mayoral Advisor TH Schee was in town and gave us a “fireside chat” insight into the secrets of Taiwan’s success here, and inspire us with ideas on how to set up an open data policy for Hong Kong. Despite styling itself as Asia’s World City, and “smart city” being the buzzword in Government circles that everybody is targeting to get funding for, Hong Kong has a long way to prove itself in this area. A smart city is an urban development vision to integrate multiple data sources to manage a city’s asset . Without open data to drive them, smart cities are doomed to failure, and Hong Kong’s poor digital policies means it will continue to be overtaken by its neighbours in innovation and technology. This means it is particularly timely and topical to ask policy lessons we can learn from our most successful neighbour in this field, Taiwan.

Hong Kong has dropped out of the top 10 of the WIPO global innovation index in recent years, and is currently ranked 37th in the Open Knowledge Open Data Index. And due to a misreading of the HK Government data licensing policy (which are not open or interoperable by any definition) without this overly generous scoring would mean we would likely rank 20-30 places lower. Contrast this with Taiwan, which in the last Index overtook the UK to be the highest ranked place in the world for Open Data. From the outside it seems a data-driven utopia, with a new “Minister for Data” moving from g0v.tw citizen-run open data groups such as ours to now being in the heart of Government.

TH Schee has been at the front line of this Taiwanese Open Data revolution, and has written interesting blogs on the topic, but it was great having him come and talk us through the backstory and potential policy lessons in person. With extra juice stories of the unsung heroes behind the scenes to be told. Meet.33 was our first gathering in a while, and it was great to see such a huge turnout. Thanks to Justice Centre Hong Kong for giving us the space in Sai Ying Pun at such short notice, and to Adam Severson for giving us an intro on the great work they do single handedly supporting refugee legal services in Hong Kong. Adam also give us a quick intro on the difficulties they as a NGO face decision making in an information vacuum where the government politicizes immigration and crime data but refuses to share any of it.

Open Data versus Natural Disasters
Getting a government sceptical of transparency to share data is a challenge, but one that Taiwan seems to have managed admirably. The process of trust building and collaboration between civic hackers and government in Taiwan had an unlikely ally: mother nature. Or more specifically, natural disasters such as the many earthquakes and typhoons that pound Taiwan with unfortunate regularity. The disastrous typhoon Morakot in 2009 was the turning point in how Taiwan dealt with data. Official government communication early in the crisis failed, causing people to turn to websites run NGOs and the civic hacker community. Web users began reporting the real-time situation on the bulletin board forum PTT and on early social media platforms like plunk. At the height of the crisis an unofficial Morakot Online Disaster Report Center was established by a group of internet users from the Association of Digital Culture. The government quickly realized that this information was saving lives, and this website was then integrated into local governments’ communication systems and updated from the official disaster response center. From the trust and experience gathered in the front line of “internet rescue management” the people involved help seed the initial environment that has allowed this open data driven society to bloom (see this published case study for more). TH presented a very detailed timeline of this covering the founding of communities such as g0v.tw and opendata.tw, data journalism and open data social enterprises spin offs, and how many the people involved in these citizen organization then made their way into the heart of government. Initially from the Mayors of Taipei and Taichung running on open data policy driven platforms, culminating in Audrey Tang becoming minister without portfolio in the new national government.
How we can take policy lessons from this in soft , natural-disaster-free Hong Kong is another matter, but it shows we need to be prepared, and we need to build similar networks of organisations leading by example. One advantage Taiwan has had is a strong open source and open access community in academia (particularly Academia Sinica) that has always been a safe haven and place of continuous support for these efforts. We don’t yet have an equivalent in Hong Kong, but some members of ODHK have just put together an overview and survey on research data policy (see the pre-print), a nascent Asian open access network is forming, and this years Open Access Week looks to be the biggest in Hong Kong so far, with 3 events organised already. We recorded TH’s talk on periscope so you can see the archive there, as well as inspect his incredibly detailed slides. A one hour discussion really wasn’t enough, and we hope we can tempt TH back another time to give us more insight. We have more regular meetups in the pipeline, and our next one is on the Wednesday 12th October on open data tools at Campfire in Kennedy Town. We hope to see many of you there, and continue to build these communities that will hopefully let Hong Kong follow a similar trajectory to Taiwan.

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ODHK.meet.33: Crafting an Open Data Policy

ODHK.meet.33: Crafting an Open Data Policy

It’s time to craft an open data policy for Hong Kong. To do this, we can learn a lot from Taiwan, who are ranked #1 on the Global Open Data Index, due in no small part to the work of TH Schee, mayoral advisor to the Taipei City Government.

We’ll talk with TH Schee to know more about the wonderful things open data is doing for Taipei and Taiwan, about the open data policies in place, how it’s working in government, and know some strategies for communicating with government and stakeholders to get support for open data. We’ll also discuss how citizens, private sector and NGOs can make informed decisions with better access to data.

Location:

Justice Centre Hong Kong, 18th Floor, 202-204 Des Voeux Road West, Sai Ying Pun, Hong Kong
Map location
MTR: Sai Ying Pun, head west from Exit A2

Thank you to the Justice Centre Hong Kong for hosting us.

More about T.h. Schee:

Since 2002, TH Schee has pioneered several web projects that spawned several local NGOs and start-ups. In 2006, he co-founded Association of Digital Cultures Taiwan, and was the local Taipei Wikimania host in 2007. In 2009, the Association became the first group in Asia to manage mobilized digital communities for crowdsourcing government data in response to a national crisis situation. Other endeavors include Puncar, the largest digital inclusion project at the local level. Schee was later awarded an Honorary Mention in Digital Communities from Prix Arts Electronica. Existing social ventures include Open Knowledge Taiwan, the Data Science Program, and various partnership initiatives that span across healthcare, urban development, and public service innovation. He has been an invited specialist on the UN-GGIM and serves at International Committee on Prix Ars Electronica. He is also mayoral advisor to the Taipei City Government.
See TH Schee’s TEDx talk (Chinese)

Date: Wednesday, September 21, 2016, 7pm.

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